Sophie Reed – Student Ambassador

Sophie Reed – Student Ambassador

1. Anki flash cards – An invaluable revision tool! Use this program to create quick fire flash cards. Actively using questions instead of just writing up notes and reviewing them is a much better way to revise. It’s also perfect for revision in short bursts and repetition is meant to aid in memorising. You can review your cards one by one and mark whether they need to be repeated again soon if you didn’t know it so well or in a few days if were confident with it. It’s a great way to help remember all the stuff we need to! You can download it for free onto your PC and phone, and can access online from where ever you are. Check it out at http://ankisrs.net/. 2. Spider diagrams/mind maps – when revising I find creating a spider diagram for key topics is a really great way of trying to scribble down everything you can remember. You soon develop an approach for doing different ones, i.e. for a key disease, you can use categories such as definition, diagnosis, aetiology, treatment etc. It is also great to link it to other topics as looking at things from different angles will help reinforce your learning. 3. Past exam papers – I managed to get hold of these from the year above and they’re an invaluable source of practice questions. Along with the answers you can see ideal ways of tackling questions. Great for identifying areas of strengths and weakness. I would recommend you only use these after you have done some revision otherwise you may tend to learn only based on...
Lucas Bramer – Student Ambassador

Lucas Bramer – Student Ambassador

1) Try and condense a topic into no more than five key points and write these down either on a flash card or paper. These should serve as prompts when revising and help you to condense information so it’s less overwhelming. 2) Write a list of things you find particularly difficult as you go through a topic or attachment. That way, when you come to revise you know which areas to start with and where to focus your efforts. 3) Test yourself as you go along. Write yourself short answer questions that focus on the areas you find most difficult and keep repeating them. That way, you’ll become more confident in the areas you find most...
Michael Modell – Student Ambassador

Michael Modell – Student Ambassador

#1 Find your way to learn Early on in your course is the best time to find out what works for you in terms of method of revision (reading or making notes or flashcards) and revision environment (alone, group, peer-to-peer, home, library). Finally, when you find ‘your way’ don’t be put off by others having their own or being further along with their timetable, we are all different. #2 Revise to plan, not plan to revise Keeping on track with your established plan or timetable is difficult, but not planning is far worse. Make sure you know you attend your lectures and seminars, have your lecture notes and know what topics are being tested. Then work out where you need to focus your attention and how long you have to achieve the necessary level. #3 Look after yourself Get into a regular pattern. Either going to bed at a sensible time, eating well, getting out of your room/flat or house to ‘get away from  work’, relaxing with friends, television or reading a non-medical book are all ideal for keeping your mental wellbeing and helps you learn more...